Wednesday, November 30, 2016

MCH staff mentor professionals in TBRI

Four Methodist Children’s Home staff members have teamed up with Texas Christian University’s Institute of Child Development to train others around the world in Trust-Based Relational Intervention (TBRI). John Warren, Lee Davis, Ian Bracken and Clarence DeGrate have all traveled to Fort Worth and Austin to serve as mentors during the institute’s TBRI practitioner training.

TCU approached our staff to see if they were interested in helping out during the week-long sessions. These trainings typically occur four times a year. Sarah Mercado, training specialist with the Institute, said mentors have become an integral part of their TBRI practitioner training. They lead small groups in role play activities as well as breakout groups to learn about sensory integration, nurture groups, life skills and mindfulness.
“They are remarkable at developing relationships and building trust to make participants comfortable and able to learn,” Mercado said. “The mentor also serves as a wonderful support for our staff. Whether they are roaming the room with a microphone to aid in audience participation, leading sensory breaks, helping carry heavy boxes or lending a hand wherever asked, they have become an invaluable part of our training.”

Warren, director of training at MCH, said he plans to serve as a mentor again this spring and enjoys being able to share TBRI with others.

“We love doing it,” he said. “It is great to be up there. It energizes us and helps give us ideas. It is good to connect and see what others around the world are doing and stay connected with the people at TCU.”

People attending the training are from various professional fields including other childcare agencies, occupational therapists, medical doctors, therapists, and educators. Lee Davis, youth care counselor supervisor at MCH, has attended three trainings as a mentor so far and also plans to return in the spring. 

“I am very happy to be able to share and to hopefully have a greater impact on the lives of kids and their caregivers,” Davis said. “Without exception, the people that I have mentored have been highly motivated and dedicated to helping children heal.”

Davis has been using TBRI in his position at MCH for five years now and believes it has a huge impact on the children we serve.

“I think that TBRI is without a doubt the best system that can be used to address the behavioral issues associated with trauma, abuse and neglect,” Davis said. “Having been on the front lines of implementing TBRI here on our campus and experiencing the tremendous positive changes in our culture, I want to share our knowledge and experience with others who have the same desire to be effective in changing the lives of children from hard places. I have been blessed to work and grow in this ministry and to use my talents in utilizing and teaching the TBRI principles.” 
“We love partnering with MCH with our mentor program,” Mercado said. “The staff are clearly TBRI champions and have wonderful hearts for kids from hard places. We know that our training is enhanced by the mentors from MCH.”

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